<br>> The conversation is welcome to stay on this list.  I believe 
both of you to be right.  Google is to be feared, however, this list had
 been indexed by Google for the past 14 years.  <span>
<div><br></div>Thank you Joel.  If I may take a moment to quote Schneier (<a href="https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2006/05/the_value_of_pr.html" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2006/05/the_value_of_pr.html</a>):<br><br><div>"Cardinal Richelieu understood the value of surveillance when he 
famously said, 'If one would give me six lines written by the hand of 
the most honest man, I would find something in them to have him hanged.' 
 Watch someone long enough, and you'll find something to arrest -- or 
just blackmail -- with.  Privacy is important because without it, 
surveillance information will be abused:  to peep, to sell to marketers 
and to spy on political enemies -- whoever they happen to be at the 
time.<br><br><p>"Privacy protects us from abuses by those in power, even if we're doing nothing wrong at the time of surveillance.</p>

<p><br></p><p>"We do nothing wrong when we make love or go to the bathroom. We are 
not deliberately hiding anything when we seek out private places for 
reflection or conversation. We keep private journals, sing in the 
privacy of the shower, and write letters to secret lovers and then burn 
them. Privacy is a basic human need.</p><p><br></p>...<br><br>"For if we are observed in all matters, we are constantly under threat
 of correction, judgment, criticism, even plagiarism of our own 
uniqueness.  We become children, fettered under watchful eyes, constantly
 fearful that -- either now or in the uncertain future -- patterns we 
leave behind will be brought back to implicate us, by whatever authority
 has now become focused upon our once-private and innocent acts.  We lose
 our individuality, because everything we do is observable and 
recordable.<br><br>

<p>"How many of us (adults) have paused during conversation in the past 
four-and-a-half years, suddenly aware that we might be eavesdropped on?  
Probably it was a phone conversation, although maybe it was an e-mail or
 instant-message exchange or a conversation in a public place.  Maybe the
 topic was terrorism, or politics, or Islam.  We stop suddenly, 
momentarily afraid that our words might be taken out of context, then we
 laugh at our paranoia and go on.  But our demeanor has changed, and our 
words are subtly altered.</p><p><br></p>

<p>"This is the loss of freedom we face when our privacy is taken from 
us.  This is life in former East Germany, or life in Saddam Hussein's 
Iraq.  And it's our future as we allow an ever-intrusive eye into our 
personal, private lives."</p><p><br></p><p><br></p><p>It is worrisome to me that Doug hasn't realized this.</p><p><br></p></div></span><br><span>

</span><br>